Looking At Edinburgh

25 December 2008

Rosebank: the rose remembers

Filed under: parks, photos, plants — Tags: , , , , , — EdinburghEye @ 8:00 am

a rose in Rosebank Cemetery

Rosebank Cemetery, opened in 1846, is still in use for burials.

This photo is available on Redbubble: The rose remembers.

10 December 2008

Autumn graves at sunset

Filed under: parks, photos, shadows and light — Tags: , , , , — EdinburghEye @ 8:00 pm

graves in Rosebank Cemetery at sunset

This photo is available on Redbubble: Autumn graves at sunset.

9 December 2008

Autumn in Rosebank Cemetery

graves in Rosebank Cemetery

Rosebank Cemetery was opened in 1846 by the Edinburgh and Leith Cemetery Company. The cemetery includes a mass grave, marked by a Celtic cross, of 215 men of the Royal Scots who came from Edinburgh and Leith and who were killed in the Gretna Rail Disaster of 1915. The cemetery also contains the memorials of many Leith ship-owners and merchants, and of two servants of Queen Victoria. There is also a small Moslem section.

This photo is available on Redbubble: Autumn in Rosebank Cemetery.

8 December 2008

City graves

Filed under: parks, photos — Tags: , , , — EdinburghEye @ 8:00 am

graves in Rosebank Cemetery

This photo is available on Redbubble: City graves.

6 December 2008

Sunset in the graveyard

Filed under: parks, photos, shadows and light — Tags: , , , — EdinburghEye @ 10:24 pm

Sunset at Rosebank Cemetery

Taken this afternoon just before sunset. Rosebank Cemetery, off Pilrig Street, was opened in 1846 by the Edinburgh and Leith Cemetery Company. It is still in use for burials.

This photo is available on Redbubble: Sunset in Rosebank Cemetery.

21 September 2008

St John’s graveyard

Filed under: buildings, churches, photos, trees — Tags: , , , , , — EdinburghEye @ 8:00 am

Graves and leaves

St Cuthbert’s beyond the wall of St John’s graveyard: green leaves.

This photo is available on Redbubble: Graves and leaves.

My result for The Perception Personality Image Test…

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15 September 2008

Anne Rutherford’s Grave

Filed under: history, people, photos — Tags: , , , , , , — EdinburghEye @ 8:00 am

gravestone in a garden

Anne Rutherford was born in 1739: she descends from the Haliburtons of Newmains, who have the hereditary right of burial in Dryburgh Abbey. The Rutherfords were a clan of Border warriors and reivers, “celebrated in many a family legend”. Jean Swinton, her mother, was of “one of the oldest families in Scotland, claiming descent from the Earls of Douglas”. John Rutherford, her father, was Professor of Medicine in the University of Edinburgh: he had been appointed to the Chair of Theory and Practice of Medicine in 1726 after studying in Leyden under Herman Boerhaave. (Family Background)

In April 1758, Anne Rutherford married Walter Scott: the Scotts are described as “a bellicose and litigious clan who since the tenth century had played a prominent role in the warfare and internecine strife that wracked the Border region”. She had 13 children: six of whom died in infancy. The ninth son, born 15th August 1771, was named Walter after his father, and survived an early bout of polio to become one of the most successful and influential writers in Scotland: his memorial stands at the East End of Princes Street, and Waverley Station is named after his most famous novel. (Poet, Novelist)

Anne Rutherford’s husband Walter Scott died in 1799: Anne Rutherford died in 1819. As Scottish custom was until well into the 20th century, she was buried under her own name, in the small enclosure at the east end of St Johns Cathedral at the West End of Princes Street.

This photo is available on Redbubble: Anne Rutherford.

6 March 2008

St Cuthberts: the Kirk below the Castle

Filed under: buildings, history, photos — Tags: , , , , , , , — EdinburghEye @ 12:05 am

This windowless tower is the most visible part of St Cuthbert’s graveyard, to a passer-by on Lothian Road or Kings Stables Road or Castle Terrace. It was built in 1827 to allow a watch to be kept on the graveyard after a body had been buried.

I took these photos here. They’re all on Redbubble: St Cuthberts.
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